Dreaming of Contextual Marketing

Rusty Warner

At Dreamforce in San Francisco earlier this week, Salesforce Marketing Cloud CEO Scott McCorkle highlighted retailer Eddie Bauer’s strategy to make marketing so good that it feels like customer service and customer service so good that it feels like marketing. He may well have added that when marketing and service are well executed, they both begin to feel like sales – or at least the extension of sales environments that they are meant to support.

This thinking underscores the blurring lines between marketing and customer experience. Where does one end and the other begin? And does it really matter? Certainly to the customer it doesn’t; all he or she wants is a great experience that delivers value appropriate to the current context. So then, why do brands continue to let organizational or functional silos get in the way? It’s easy to say that legacy systems and processes still dictate what brands are able to achieve, but surely with today’s business technology capabilities, it’s possible to do better.

Brands highlighted at Dreamforce not only do better: they blend marketing, services and sales for a seamless customer experience. Take Fitbit, for example. Of course the Fitbit business model is based on interaction and context, but Fitbit has taken things to another level by ensuring that marketing content is fully incorporated into app functionality instead of pushing messages at customers. Up-sell, cross-sell and promotional content appear when contextually relevant and blend smoothly with customer services information and sales/transactional opportunities.

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The Bundle Begins To Crumble

Jim Nail

The past week has been big for the TV business, and the once indivisible bundle of networks that come in pay-TV subscriptions has begun to unravel:

  • ESPN and the NBA hinted that they would launch a streaming service that viewers could subscribe to without a cable, satellite, or telco pay-TV subscription. 
  • HBO wasn't so subtle -- They flat out announced they will launch a standalone HBO Go subscription in 2015.
  • CBS announced a new All Access product, offering current season series not available on other streaming services, plus a library of past episodes and shows.
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Q&A With Ryan C. Green, Managing Director Customer Strategy And Development, Southwest Airlines

John Dalton

In the airline industry, Southwest is no stranger to customer experience accolades. In fact, it consistently earns top marks on Forrester’s Customer Experience Index compared to other carriers – offering enjoyable and easy experiences that meet customers' needs.

It will be a pleasure to hear directly from Southwest’s Managing Director of Customer Strategy and Development, Ryan Green, next month at Forrester’s Customer Experience Forum West in Anaheim, CA. To get an early taste for why Southwest is known for its experience, and the strategy behind it, read on.

Q&A with Ryan Green, Managing Director Customer Strategy & Development, Southwest Airlines

Q: When did your company first begin focusing on customer experience? Why?

A: Southwest Airlines has always been focused on the Customer. Our company started with the vision to give people the freedom to fly and our differentiator has always been policies and services that lean towards the Customer. As a result, we now fly more passengers domestically, increased our airports served dramatically and Southwest Airlines’ Customer complaints are the lowest in the industry. As we’ve grown and the industry has become more competitive we’ve definitely continued uncovering what our Customers need and want from Southwest Airlines and we are focused on giving them that experience to keep them coming back time and again.

Q: What aspects of the experience that your company delivers matter most to your customers? 

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Agile, flexible, modern BI deployments often require help from the professionals

Boris Evelson

Digitally empowered customers — both businesses and consumers — wield a huge influence on enterprise strategies, policies, and customer-facing and internal processes. With mobile devices, the Internet, and all-but-unlimited access to information about products, services, prices, and deals, customers are now well informed about companies and their products, and are able to quickly find alternatives and use peer pressure to drive change. But not all organizations have readily embraced this new paradigm shift, desperately clinging to rigid policies and inflexible business processes. A common thread running through the profile of most of the companies that are not succeeding in this new day and age is an inability to manage change successfully. Business agility — reacting to fast-changing business needs — is what enables businesses to thrive amid ever-accelerating market changes and dynamics.

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Technology Imperatives To Manage The Ebola Outbreak

Skip Snow

The Ebola outbreak serves as a portrait of the fact that the health systems of the globe must be radically interconnected in order to ensure that global outbreaks like this have a chance of being contained. We are not in the 19th century where the massive migrations of populations took place using slow-moving transport and thus where the incubation periods of most diseases would have in all likelihood passed before a person approached a border.

Today I can be infected by a disease, and within hours be on a plane that crosses the world. Traditional public health precautions of quarantining the sick will not necessarily be effective. And so we must think though a better manner of managing what is fast becoming a continental pandemic and could easily become a global pandemic.

The picture above is from the emergency room entrance at Mt. Sinai Hospital on the corner of 100th street and Madison Ave. in Manhattan.

That the disease is out of control just now is documented by the current (October 15th) World Health Organization report on the roadmap to respond to the outbreak (http://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/10665/136508/1/roadmapsitrep15Oct2014.pdf?ua=1) which states:

“It is clear however that the situation in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone is deteriorating, with widespread and persistent transmission.”

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Creating the Data Governance Killer App

Michele Goetz

One of the biggest stumbling blocks is getting business resources to govern data.  We've all heard it:

"I don't have time for this."

"Do you really need a full time person?"

"That really isn't my job."

"Isn't that an IT thing?"

"Can we just get a tool or hire a service company to fix the data?"

Let's face it, resources are the data governance killer even in the face of organizations trying to take on enterprise lead data governance efforts.

What we need to do is rethink the data governance bottlenecks and start with the guiding principle that data can only be governed when you have the right culture throughout the organization.  The point being, you need accountability with those that actually know something about the data, how it is used, and who feels the most pain.  That's not IT, that's not the data steward.  It's the customer care representative, the sales executive, the claims processor, the assessor, the CFO, and we can go on.  Not really the people you would normally include regularly in your data governance program.  Heck, they are busy!

But, the path to sustainable effective data governance is data citizenship - where everyone is a data steward.  So, we have to strike the right balance between automation, manual governance, and scale.  This is even more important as out data and system ecosystems are exploding in size, sophistication, and speed.  In the world of MDM and data quality vendors are looking specifically at how to get around these challenges.  There are five (5) areas of innovation:

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Q&A with Olivier Mourrieras, Vice President, Customer Experience Centre of Competence, E.On, Part 2

Harley Manning

You know what the Holy Grail is for an analyst? It’s results data – especially financial results data. And that’s especially true for analysts who cover customer experience because all too often CX professionals don’t track – or won’t share – their results.

That’s why I’m especially pleased with what I am able to share with you today.

Last week I posted part 1 of Forrester’s customer experience Q&A with Olivier Mourrieas of E.On, one of the world's largest investor-owned electric utility service providers. Olivier will be speaking at Forrester’s Forum for Customer Experience Professionals EMEA in London on November 17 and 18, 2014, and he was kind enough to share some thoughts with us in advance of his appearance.

This week I’m posting part 2 of Olivier’s answers, in which he tells us the tangible business results that the E.On CX program has achieved.

I hope you enjoy what he has to say and I look forward to seeing some of you in London!

Q: How do you measure the success of your customer experience improvement efforts (e.g., higher customer satisfaction, increased revenue, lower costs)? And have you seen progress over time?

There are hard and soft benefits which we are continuously demonstrating:

Hard Benefits:

  • Churn reduction: Increasing Net Promoter Score (NPS) leads to increased loyalty. This will help to stabilise the Private Household and SME customer base.
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Design Thinking Drives Innovation With Drop, A Connected Kitchen Product

Allegra Burnette

Sculture at Staunton FarmAfter a gorgeous long fall weekend tramping around ponds and through pastures in search of sculpture, while oohing and aahing over the upstate New York autumnal palette of greens, yellows, oranges, and reds, I got a nice welcome back to work today. My first Forrester report is live on our client site! It’s a case study on Drop, an iPad-connected kitchen scale and recipe app, which was developed by a small team based in Ireland and is currently in pre-order.

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Salesforce.com Enters The BI Market With Wave, The Salesforce Analytics Cloud

Boris Evelson

There just might be another 800-lb gorilla in the Business Intelligence market. In a year.

The popular cult book “Hitchhiker's Guide To The Galaxy” by Douglas Adams defines space as “. . . big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind-bogglingly big it is. . .” There are no better words to describe the size and the opportunity of the business intelligence market. Not only is it “mind-bogglingly big,” but over the last few decades we’ve only scratched the surface. Recent Forrester research shows that only 12% of global enterprise business and technology decision-makers are sure of their ability to transform and use information for better insights and decision making, and over half still have BI and analytics content sitting in siloed desktop-based shadow IT applications that are mostly based on spreadsheets.

The opportunity has provided fertile feeding ground to more than fifty vendors, including: full-stack software vendors like IBM, Microsoft, Oracle, and SAP, each with $1 billion-plus BI portfolios; SAS Institute, a multibillion BI and analytics specialist; popular BI vendors Actuate, Information Builders, MicroStrategy, Qlik, Tableau Software, and Tibco Software, each with hundreds of millions in BI revenues; as well as dozens of vendors ranging from early to late stage startups.

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It Takes A Village To Make Your Marketing Technology Investments Thrive

Sheryl Pattek

Having its root as an Igbo and Yoruba Nigerian proverb, “It takes a village” has come to mean that the responsibility for raising children is shared across the larger family and community. But it hasn’t stopped there. Hillary Clinton adopted this proverb as her own when she published a book on children and family values in 1995. And in May 2014, Pope Francis had a crowd of more than 300,000 school students outside the Vatican chant the saying over and over again.

This simple proverb has taken on an important meaning throughout the world, as it communicates the importance of community, cooperation, sharing, and bringing together the skills of many different parts of the community to produce the best result — the raising of a well-rounded child.

But at its core, “It takes a village” applies to more than just raising children.

In a business environment, “it takes a village” applies to how you find and then bring together the best resources to grow your business.  Speaking at Salesforce Dreamforce 2014 this morning, Hillary Clinton shared her views of how organizations must do good while doing well by adopting the core values of innvation, fun and giving back to the "village" at large.

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