How "Data In, Data Out" Solves Social Marketing Challenges

Nate Elliott

It turns out that marketers aren’t very happy with the social relationship platforms that help them manage their Facebook and Twitter accounts; in fact, most would recommend you not choose the technology partner they did.

There are lots of reasons for this dissatisfaction, but the biggest is that most vendors just aren’t solving the problems that social relationship marketers face. Yesterday we published a new report detailing social relationship marketers' top challenges:

  1. Measurement. Most just don't know what impact, if any, their Facebook pages and Twitter accounts have.
  2. Content. Marketers struggle both to decide what type of content to publish, and then to find good content assets to use.
  3. Staffing. Many say they just don't have enough human resources to handle the every tasks of social relationship marketing.
  4. Scheduling. Marketers don't know when to post their content for maximum impact.
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The Data Digest: Photo Uploads: Awareness, Excitement, Engagement

Anjali Lai

Walt Disney once said, “of all our inventions for mass communication, pictures still speak the most universally understood language.” Perhaps he was more prescient than anyone realized at that time: Decades later, the onslaught of social media and the emergence of mobile phones have made his assertion seem truer than ever, as consumers have gained the tools to share a picture with the global population in a matter of seconds. Today, the fascination with pictures has come to define communication that spans both the offline and online worlds.

According to Forrester’s Consumer Technographics® data, sharing visual content is indeed a universal phenomenon — but it is most prevalent in countries like China, India, and Brazil:

 

Some believe that our obsession with taking and sharing photographs speaks to a modern narcissistic culture. Indeed, Pew Research reports that the majority of Millennial consumers post “selfies” on social networking sites. However, when Ellen DeGeneres’ Oscar “selfie” became the most retweeted tweet ever this week, narcissism was hardly part of the conversation. Instead, Ellen’s post exemplified what can happen when the power of the picture meets the power of social media: large-scale awareness, excitement, and engagement.

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Why Won't Marketers Recommend Their Social Vendors?

Nate Elliott

In 2013, we published a Forrester Wave™ evaluation on Social Relationship Platforms — the technologies that help marketers publish content to social networks like Facebook and Twitter, as well as monitor and respond to customer posts on those sites.

We evaluated established SRPs like Spredfast, Sprinklr, Shoutlet, Adobe Social, and salesforce.com’s Buddy Media, and found that none of them were good enough to fall into our “Leaders” category. Why? For one thing, most had significant gaps in their offerings.

But we also found that many of their customers weren’t terribly satisfied. Even though all the clients we spoke with were referred to us by the vendors themselves — and so presumably were amongst each SRP’s happiest customers — most had some reservations about the features, functionality, and service the vendors provided. In several cases, we were shocked by how little the reference clients thought of their technology partners.

One year later, we decided to check in on whether marketers had grown any more satisfied with their social relationship platforms. For a new report out today, we asked 56 marketers who used a variety of SRPs whether they’d recommend their vendor to a colleague — and found that overall, social relationship platforms have a Net Promoter Score of -16. Yes, that’s negative sixteen.

 

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Forrester's Customer Experience Index For China, 2014

Samantha Jaddou

For the past seven years, Forrester has reported on how consumers rate their experiences with major brands in the US by publishing our annual report, the Customer Experience Index (CXi). The CXi has helped us identify customer experience leaders and helped many top brands in the US benchmark their customer experience against their peers.

This year for the first time, we’re bringing this study to China in order to help us understand the quality of the customer experience in this market. In fewer than two weeks, I’ll be revealing the CXi results for China in Shanghai at Forrester’s Summit For Marketing & Strategy Professionals: China

  

During my track session, I will:

  • Share the interesting and surprising findings in this year’s CXi results for China.
  • Talk about what some leading companies are doing to enhance their customer experience in China.
  • Give you actionable advice on how to improve your customer experience maturity.

The event will also provide a good opportunity for me to hear you out. I am eager to learn about your pain points relating to customer experience in this market.

I look forward to seeing you in Shanghai! 上海见!

Data Governance: Did We Make The Right Choices?

Michele Goetz

Coming back from the SAS Industry Analyst Event left me with one big question - Are we taking into account the recommendations or insights provided through analysis and see if they actually produced positive or negative results?

It's a big question for data governance that I'm not hearing discussed around the table.  We often emphsize how data is supplied, but how it performs in it's consumed state is fogotten.  

When leading business intelligence and analytics teams I always pushed to create reports and analysis that ultimately incented action.  What you know should influence behavior and decisions, even if the influence was to say, "Don't change, keep up the good work!"  This should be a fundamental function of data govenance.  We need to care not only that the data is in the right form factor but also review what the data tells us/or how we interpret the data and did it make us better?

I've talked about the closed-loop from a master data management perspective - what you learn about customers will alter and enrich the customer master.  The connection to data governance is pretty clear in this case.  However, we shouldn't stop at raw data and master definitions.  Our attention needs to include the data business users receive and if it is trusted and accurate.  This goes back to the fact that how the business defines data is more than what exists in a database or application.  Data is a total, a percentage, an index.  This derived data is what the business expects to govern - and if derived data isn't supporting business objectives, that has to be incorporated into the data governance discussion.

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Creating Customer-Centric eBusiness Experiences In China

Zia Daniell Wigder

On March 19th, I’ll be joining several of my colleagues in Shanghai, China for our Summit for Marketing & Strategy Professionals. One of the themes we’ve been exploring recently is how the age of the customer translates in the Chinese market. During my session at the summit, I will discuss some of the following things that the most customer-obsessed businesses, and savviest eBusiness leaders, are doing to effectively compete in China. These leaders:

Understand their customers and use this information to be as relevant as possible. In China, a growing number of eCommerce players are using customer data to help drive sales online, for example, by providing detailed product recommendations. As in other parts of the world, however, many eBusiness executives in China are at the early stages of truly understanding their customers and using this information to be relevant in their daily lives. We’ll look at how some brands use customer data effectively today, and what some of the more innovative use case scenarios look like in eBusiness.  

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SingTel Should Appeal To OTT Players, Not Regulators

Clement Teo

At Mobile World Congress 2014 in Barcelona, SingTel CEO Chua Sock Koong was reported as “call[ing] on Australian regulators to give carriers like Optus the right to charge rivals WhatsApp and Skype for use of their networks or risk a major decline in network investment.”

With the telecommunications industry unable to monetize over-the-top (OTT) traffic, telcos will struggle to find the funding they need to improve their infrastructure — meaning that network quality could deteriorate. Chua did concede that telcos should work toward partnering with OTT players.

What It Means

SingTel’s argument runs over familiar ground, similar to the ongoing net neutrality debate in the US. My colleagues suggest that telcos will offer tiered access at tiered pricing to OTT players in the future, charging higher prices for better connection speeds and greater data traffic. While I don’t doubt this, price-sensitive Asia may be a harder nut to crack; telcos here run the risk of customer churn by raising service prices.

Aside from speeding up its rate of service innovation, SingTel should:

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3 Personal Cloud Startups Worth Watching

Michael Yamnitsky

[Written with Nate Fleming, Research Associate]

We all use a multitude of personal cloud apps, both at work and at home. But getting meaningful tasks accomplished can be frustrating, particularly on mobile, as files, data, and workflows fragment across the various services we use. Take for example finalizing and signing a contract on iOS. This would involve fetching a document from email, annotating it, signing it, and sending it back to the client. Today, no one app can do all that, and iOS and Android offers very limited data-interoperability functionality with both Open In and Android Intent features.

We’re seeing three types of personal cloud startups emerging to offering capabilities to link across apps, services and devices:

  • Access: search, unified visibility, and portability for files, photos, and information. Younity networks and delivers content across your devices using P2P technology. And Otixo facilitates data interoperability across cloud services within a virtual file system-type interface. Simply drag and drop to move files from one service to another.
  • Interconnection: tasks and data flows that use info from multiple services. Ink facilitates workflows as an alternative to iOS’s Open In.
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The Native Advertising Answer Is Publishers’ Problem

Ryan Skinner

[Recently, I wrote that overly optimistic or pessimistic predictions of native advertising’s future were the result of vast (and naïve) assumptions. I concluded that a more accurate prediction would not hinge upon grand theories about how great native advertising is or isn’t, but rather a wily assessment of many factors – the foxlike approach of Isaiah Berlin’s Hedgehog and the Fox. I said I’d offer such a foxy assessment. Here’s that assessment.]

First, let’s consider the two grand theories of native advertising – the hedgehog positions:

1) Native advertising is the best thing that could have happened.
According to this theory, native advertising at last frees the world from interruptive or parasitic advertisements and allows both the publisher site and advertiser to work toward a shared goal: the best possible experience for the user or reader. Success will be measured directly by readers actually choosing to consume stuff from brands, which means it’ll all be worth more and publishers will earn a bigger cut.

2) Native advertising is the worst thing that could have happened.
According to this theory, native advertising depends fundamentally on confusing the reader into clicking on an advertisement by disguising it as unpaid site editorial. As a result, readers will lose their trust in the sites’ editorial integrity and abandon the site. This loss of integrity will destroy the halo effect, whereby a site’s editorial integrity reflects positively on the advertisers associated with it.

True hedgehogs could expound on these arguments at length (they have a tendency to do that), but I’ve represented the basic positions.

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You Should Attend Next Year’s RSA Conference Innovation Sandbox

Rick Holland

Last week I attended the RSA Conference (RSAC) Innovation Sandbox for the first time.  Not only was I an attendee, but I also was fortunate enough to host a CTO panel during the event. For those that aren’t aware, the Innovation Sandbox is one of the more popular programs of the RSAC week.  The highlight of the Innovation Sandbox is the competition for the coveted “Most Innovative Company at the RSA Conference” award.  This is basically the information security version of ABC’s Shark Tank.  If you want to learn about the up-and-coming vendors and technologies, this is one place to do it. To participate, companies had to meet the following criteria: 

  • The product has been in the market for less than one year (launched after February 2013).
  • The company must be privately held, with less than $5M in revenue in 2013.
  • The product has the potential to make a significant impact on the information security space.
  • The product can be demonstrated live and on-site during Innovation Sandbox.
  • The company has a management team that has proven successful in the delivery of products to market.
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