Q&A With Jeroen Tas, Chief Executive Officer, Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips Healthcare

Sharyn Leaver

Our Forum For Technology Management Leaders in London starts tomorrow and I'm very excited about the program that we have been able to put together across the two days. On day one, we will be hearing from Jeroen Tas, Chief Executive Officer, Informatics Solutions and Services, Philips Healthcare, about how he and his team have evolved IT to become a fundamental enabler of growth for Philips as a real-time, connected company. Jeroen has over 30 years of global experience as an entrepreneur and senior executive in the financial services, healthcare, and information technology industries. Before taking on his current position, Jeroen was the Group Chief Information Officer of Royal Philips, leading IT worldwide. 

In the run-up to the Forum, I asked Jeroen to answer a number of questions on Philips Healthcare's digital business journey. Jeroen's answers are a must-read for healthcare- and other technology management leaders about to embark on the same journey, and provide great insight into the challenges of making connected healthcare a reality. I look forward to hearing Jeroen speak on the main stage tomorrow!

Q: You have been a driving force behind Philips Healthcare’s strategy to create a connected healthcare world. Can you explain your approach?

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Docker Will Disrupt Virtualization And Drive Cloud Adoption

Charlie Dai

On June 9, Docker.com announced that it will release version 1.0 of Docker, an open source platform that could automate the deployment of various types of applications as lightweight, portable, self-sufficient containers and run them virtually on any infrastructure. This announcement indicates that the platform is ready for commercial use, including lightweight, portable runtime support and packaging via Docker Engine and cloud services for application sharing and process automation via Docker Hub.

We talked to some early adopters of Docker, including global ISVs and local solution providers. We believe that Docker-based solutions will disrupt the server virtualization market segment and further drive the adoption of cloud because of their:

  • Technology advantages. Today’s componentized applications often rely on other components, applications, or services. For instance, your Ruby on Rails applications might rely on MongoDB as a persistence layer while using nginx as a web server. Each component might also have its own set of dependencies, which could conflict with each other. Docker can easily package the necessary dependencies and separate them within their own containers.
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Ready Or Not, Metrics Will Decide Your RWD Success

Mark Grannan

Earlier this spring I was determined to tell the responsive web site management/operation story as a linkage between RWD’s business metrics and operational/site performance metrics and improvement tactics. Instead, I found a fragmented story: The business teams have different processes, tools, and goals from technical teams, whereby ‘management’ happens in isolation from ‘operation.’ Business teams that need to prove the ROI of RWD simply did not have a direct linkage to site performance, operations, and monitoring efforts. Compounding the problem, many front-end development agencies that build responsive sites don’t focus on metrics because they aren’t contracted for managed services after the site goes live. As a result, responsive site owners/committees must find their own fix, and our recent research is designed to address both RWD’s performance operations (i.e., speed) issues and business-value analysis for responsive sites:

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A Simple Video That Explains The Mobile Mind Shift

Josh Bernoff

Are you in need of a quick and simple way to explain what mobile moments are and how they apply in the mobile mind shift?

Short of having Ted, Julie, or me come to your office and raise everyone's awareness (and yes, I would do that), you could use the new video we just created.

I've embedded it below. Here's the embed code if you want to put it on your own site:

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/2B3sgPATIWo?list=PLb2GHiJomz-zLF0uYiNzliolFqPJDQnDb" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Thanks to BREVEOmedia for helping to produce this video.

Red Hat Releases RHEL 7 – Linux Continues Its March To The Top

Richard Fichera

When the first Linux distributions based on the 3.0 kernel were released almost a year ago, I was struck by how far Linux had advanced. The latest turn of the crank for Linux, in the form of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7 (RHEL 7), reinforces this opinion. Built primarily on recent versions of the Linux 3.0 et seq kernel available to the entire Linux community, including SUSE, Red Hat, Cannonical and others, RHEL 7 continues the progress of the Linux community toward an OS that is fully capable of replacing proprietary RISC/UNIX for the vast majority of enterprise workloads. It is apparent, both from the details on RHEL 7 and from perusing the documentation on other distribution providers, that Linux has continued to mature nicely as both a foundation for large scale-out clouds as well as a strong contender for the kind of enterprise workloads that previously were only comfortable on either RISC/UNIX systems or large Microsoft Server systems. In effect, Linux has continued its maturation to the point where its feature set and scalability begin to look like and feel like a top-tier UNIX.

In addition to the required low-level plumbing – schedulers, memory management and file systems capable of keeping up with both high-volume transactions and operating effectively in large distributed clusters – Red Hat has also focused on features to improve the installation and management experience, thus directly reducing cost of ownership, following in the footsteps of other modern OS development trajectories.

Among the enterprise technology that caught my eye:

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CISOs, CMOs: What's It Like Working With The Privacy Pro In Your Organization?

Heidi Shey

Business needs and requirements demand expertise and coordination for privacy programs and practices. As a result, chief privacy officers, data protection officers, and other designated privacy professionals like privacy analysts are a fast growing presence within the enterprise today. The International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP) is 16,000 members strong today (compared to 7,500 back in 2010) and growing!    

In many organizations, a dedicated privacy professional (e.g., a full-time employee who focuses on privacy and not someone who has privacy responsibilities attached to another role) is a new role. Privacy professionals come from a variety of backgrounds from legal to IT, and the details of their role and focus can vary depending on the organization and the size of the privacy team. Yet they all have one thing in common: they must work together with multiple privacy stakeholders – IT, security, legal, HR, marketing, and more! – across the enterprise. And honestly, it’s not always easy. Like any relationship, there are ups and downs.

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Cisco Extends Its Data And Analytics Capabilities At Its Annual Cisco Live Event

Gene Cao

At the Cisco Live Event 2014 in San Francisco last week, we heard about plenty of updates, extensions, and new acquisitions to expand the business. The major technologies highlighted were InterCloud, Application Centric Infrastructure (ACI), and the Internet of Everything (IoE). Among these new offerings, I reveal that Cisco’s extended big data and analytics capabilities excited me the most. Why? Because its data virtualization techniques can help customers easily analyze large volumes of virtual data, no matter where it physically resides; enhanced video analytics technology could improve the customer experience when checking out in retail stores or waiting for a train; while IoE analytics and digital intelligence increase customer engagement.

  • Data virtualization supports big data analytics. End user organizations realize the importance of quickly and carefully making decisions; to do this, they plan to centralize data from different branch offices or departments. Consolidating data that resides in multiple systems and in global locations — or that is locked away in spreadsheets — is expensive. For example, telecom operators in China have hundreds of millions subscribers and need to consolidate and analyze this customer data — but it resides in 31 provincial companies. Data consolidation will be a huge and expensive project, but data virtualization technology can help solve this problem. Customers could consider adding Cisco to their data virtualization vendor shortlist, especially given Cisco’s acquisition of Composite Software last July.
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Something Like Democratic Marketing

Ryan Skinner

Set against marketing messages, I would rather listen to my neighbor’s opinion of a product. A critic’s opinion. An expert’s. Any idiot with an Internet connection, in fact (according to our research, review content from complete strangers is more trustworthy than messages from brands).

The payload of this realization – that marketers’ messages are overinvested in by a million percent and underdeliver by an equal value – strikes our marketing foundations, oh so softly. Thud. Pop. Distant thunder.

Simultaneously it’s never been easier for other people to write about our brands, to create breathtaking personal tributes to our products, to call out our worst policies, and even to slander us. The crowds have snatched the megaphone and they won’t give it back.

These are two factors in a big equation that we’re still only beginning to calculate.

So far, we’ve dealt with these changes pragmatically and conservatively.

Community management is a perfect example of the pragmatic response. Community management is just a series of tribal agreements about playing rules. The brand will not allow threads that include the word “shit”. The brand will retweet only tweets from registered users. The brand answers requests within one hour between 9 AM and 9 PM EST. The brand will blog politely about its topic.

The marketing fortress has collapsed, the mobs are baying for blood, and the sop you throw this change is to play nice? This is what I’d call the Marie Antoinette response.

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Apple Extensibility And Powerful Network Effects

Michael Yamnitsky

Apple’s new "Extensibility" feature took somewhat of a backseat to a host of exciting new developer tools announced at Apple’s developer conference a week ago. I’d like to briefly highlight its importance to the enterprise. 

In short, Extensibility makes it easy for apps to talk to each other, facilitating more complex mobile workflows and easy access to data stored in personal cloud services. It will spur app developers work together to speed the advancement of what employees will be able to accomplish on mobile. 

 To elaborate, Extensibility will enable:

  • Complex inter-app workflows for mobile employees. More advanced content creation apps have been slow to develop on mobile platforms, in part due to lack of app interoperability. Think of the multiple software tools we use to pull a contract from email, sign it, and send it back on a PC. Data must similarly flow across a variety of apps to accomplish this on mobile. Apple has done little to address this, until now.
  • Access to the personal cloud in enterprise apps. Employees rely on personal cloud services like Dropbox and Evernote to manage an expanding array of digital content online. But these repositories don’t integrate with the enterprise off the bat. Extensibility can act as a router to connect personal data with the apps your employees use every day on the job. 
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Five Global Marketplaces All Brands Must Know

Zia Daniell Wigder

Global online expansion is not the same game it was just a few years ago. Today companies are taking a multi-pronged approach to international expansion and looking at a variety of different ways to tap into online shoppers in different markets. One approach that has been gaining momentum is the use of global marketplaces.

Traditionally dominated by small- and medium-sized businesses, online marketplaces have been extending their offerings for global brand owners. Brands today have a growing number of options to build out enhanced official storefronts on these global marketplaces, reaching hundreds of millions of online shoppers in the process.

Our report published this morning on Five Global Marketplaces All Brands Must Know (client access required) focuses on the opportunities and challenges of selling through global marketplaces. In the report, we profile:

Amazon. The giant of US online retail offers brands more than just a point of entry into the US market – brand store options are available in all 10 markets in North America, Europe and Asia in which the company operates marketplaces.

eBay. eBay's global offerings are growing rapidly: Current marketplace options for brands in countries such as the US, the UK and Australia being supplemented with new offerings in emerging eCommerce markets. The company has taken innovative steps to tap into the cross-border online shopper. 

MercadoLibre. This long-time leader in Latin American eCommerce has rolled out enhanced brand store options over the past year, opening up opportunities for brands looking to tap into the millions of new consumers starting to shop online in the region every year.

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