4 Must do's for continuous business innovation: identify improvements, Implement change, Deliver results, Measure impact.

Diego Lo Giudice

The modern business world echoes with the sound of time-tested business models being shattered by digital upstarts, while the rate of disruption is accelerating. Organizations that will win in this world must hone their ability to deliver high-value experiences, based on high quality software with very short refresh cycles. Customers are driving this shift; every experience raises their expectations and their choices are no longer limited. Like trust, loyalty takes years to build and only a moment to lose. The threat is existential: Organizations need to drive innovation and disrupt their competitors or they will cease to exist.  

The Mordern Application Delivery (MAD) strategy document of the MAD playbook that my colleague Kurt Bitner and I are co-leading, has a wealth of research to help transform IT led organizations in Technology Management ones where BT leads over IT to achieve high levels of continuous business innovation to win, serve and retain customers.

In talking to hundreds of vendors, system integrators and end user clients that develop, test and deliver software and application every day we've come to realize that:

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4 Must do's for continuous business innovation: identify improvements, Implement change, Deliver Results, Measure Impact.

Diego Lo Giudice

The modern business world echoes with the sound of time-tested business models being shattered by digital upstarts, while the rate of disruption is accelerating. Organizations that will win in this world must hone their ability to deliver high-value experiences, based on high quality software with very short refresh cycles. Customers are driving this shift; every experience raises their expectations and their choices are no longer limited. Like trust, loyalty takes years to build and only a moment to lose. The threat is existential: Organizations need to drive innovation and disrupt their competitors or they will cease to exist.  

The Mordern Application Delivery (MAD) strategy document of the MAD playbook that my colleague Kurt Bitner and I are co-leading, has a wealth of research to help transform IT led organizations in Technology Management ones where BT leads over IT to achieve high levels of continuous business innovation to win, serve and retain customers.

In talking to hundreds of vendors, system integrators and end user clients that develop, test and deliver software and application every day we've come to realize that:

Read more

4 Must do's for continuous business innovation: identify improvements, Implement change, Deliver Results, Measure Impact.

Diego Lo Giudice

The modern business world echoes with the sound of time-tested business models being shattered by digital upstarts, while the rate of disruption is accelerating. Organizations that will win in this world must hone their ability to deliver high-value experiences, based on high quality software with very short refresh cycles. Customers are driving this shift; every experience raises their expectations and their choices are no longer limited. Like trust, loyalty takes years to build and only a moment to lose. The threat is existential: Organizations need to drive innovation and disrupt their competitors or they will cease to exist.  

The Mordern Application Delivery (MAD) strategy document of the MAD playbook that my colleague Kurt Bitner and I are co-leading, has a wealth of research to help transform IT led organizations in Technology Management ones where BT leads over IT to achieve high levels of continuous business innovation to win, serve and retain customers.

In talking to hundreds of vendors, system integrators and end user clients that develop, test and deliver software and application every day we've come to realize that:

Read more

4 Must do's for continuous business innovation: identify improvements, Implement change, Deliver Results, Measure Impact.

Diego Lo Giudice

The modern business world echoes with the sound of time-tested business models being shattered by digital upstarts, while the rate of disruption is accelerating. Organizations that will win in this world must hone their ability to deliver high-value experiences, based on high quality software with very short refresh cycles. Customers are driving this shift; every experience raises their expectations and their choices are no longer limited. Like trust, loyalty takes years to build and only a moment to lose. The threat is existential: Organizations need to drive innovation and disrupt their competitors or they will cease to exist.  

The Mordern Application Delivery (MAD) strategy document of the MAD playbook that my colleague Kurt Bitner and I are co-leading, has a wealth of research to help transform IT led organizations in Technology Management ones where BT leads over IT to achieve high levels of continuous business innovation to win, serve and retain customers.

In talking to hundreds of vendors, system integrators and end user clients that develop, test and deliver software and application every day we've come to realize that:

Read more

Proofpoint Acquires Nexgate: SRC Market Matures, But Still Lots Of “Points To Prove”

Nick Hayes

Yesterday, Proofpoint announced it will acquire social risk and compliance (SRC) vendor Nexgate for approximately $35 million.

The Acquisition Signals The SRC Market Is Maturing

This acquisition points to a budding and rapidly evolving SRC market. With the proliferation of social media, organizations face a slew of emerging regulatory challenges, brand threats, and security vulnerabilities – just look at recent incidents with Cole Haan, Zarbee’s, US Airways, British Gas, among countless others, even including our own US military. While once a niche market helping financial services firms meet FINRA obligations, SRC solutions now offer more than just compliance support, helping organizations better manage today’s wide gamut of social risks with social threat detection, account protection, and risk monitoring.

Proofpoint Has To Prove The Sum Is Greater Than Its Parts

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Turn your customer loyalty strategic plan into an action plan

Emily Collins

Blogged in collaboration with Samantha Ngo, Senior Research Associate, serving Customer Insights professionals.

Even if you have a clear idea of where you want to end up, the route you take to customer loyalty isn't always straightforward. Outlining a strategic plan helps you understand what you need to do, but a roadmap identifies howwhen and with what resources you should tackle each step. Forrester believes there are six components to designing an effective loyalty roadmap:

  1. Time frame: The expected completion of tasks and delivery of results.
  2. Desired outcomes: Key performance indicators (KPIs)that help you benchmark the performance of your advancing strategy based on your maturity.
  3. Strategic themes: A summary of the objectives an organization needs to advance its strategy.
  4. Key steps: The specific tasks — pulled straight from the strategic plan — which an organization must complete to graduate to the next maturity level.
  5. Dependencies: The people, process, and technology required to execute the key steps. Changes to the current approach may require acquiring new team members, implementing formal processes, or buying loyalty technology.
  6. Investment level: Where and when the allocated loyalty budget will be spent.
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Microsoft and Dell Change the Private/Hybrid Cloud Game with On-Premise Azure

Richard Fichera

What was announced?

On October 20 at TechEd, Microsoft quietly slipped in what looks like a potential game-changing announcement in the private/hybrid cloud world when they rolled out Microsoft Cloud Platform System (CPS), an integrated hardware/software system that combines an Azure-consistent on premise cloud with an optimized hardware stack from Dell.

Why does it matter?

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Salesforce.com And Risk Analytics – They May Soon Be A Vendor To Watch?

Nick Hayes

Last week Salesforce.com (SFDC) hosted its annual Dreamforce Conference in San Francisco, and for the first time, the cloud giant’s products could soon have some major implications in the governance, risk, and compliance (GRC) market.

Amidst the chaos of keynotes, partner sessions, guest speakers like Hilary Clinton, wil.i.am, Al Gore, and our very own George Colony, two of SFDC’s major announcements demonstrated how its new offerings and future strategy will position the company to compete in the very big business intelligence market:

  1. SFDC plans to grow from $5.4 billion to $20 billion by competing more directly with BI vendors like SAP
  2. SFDC announced its "Wave" Analytics Cloud offering, which helps deliver dashboards and analytics from any data source in its platform.
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The Data Digest: Consumer Perspectives On Healthcare Reform, One Year Later

Anjali Lai

With Kristopher Arcand

If the healthcare industry exhibited symptoms of dysfunction, the US government administered a wave of treatment in the form of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. October 2013 marked the opening of online insurance marketplaces, and set the stage for the act's requirement that most US residents have health insurance coverage. As a result, the industry has witnessed cessations and regenerations, and the pulse of consumer sentiment has fluctuated. Now, one year on, we’re due for a checkup.

At a macro level, US online consumers’ perspectives on healthcare reform today are largely consistent with those immediately preceding open enrollment under the federal law: Individuals continue to be skeptical of policy changes. However, at a micro level, subtle yet fundamental shifts in the consumer mindset signal a gradual evolution in perceptions of healthcare.

Our Technographics 360 research approach, which synthesizes Forrester’s ConsumerVoices Market Research Online Community insight and aggregated social listening data, shows that the conversation about healthcare has shifted from politics to experience -- and, in particular, to a focus on cost:

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Right Size Your CRM To Your Needs

Kate Leggett

CRM solutions have been on the market for a long time. The first products were introduced over two decades ago, and many features are commoditized. New vendors are continually pushing the envelope on CRM capabilities and exploring the “white space” of capabilities that are not necessarily core to CRM. Old stalwarts are working on capabilities that differentiate them from others - like verticalized offerings, offerings tuned to to mobile user, offerings tuned to a certain size or complexity of organization.

CRM buyers need to remember that more capabilities these days is not better; more is simply more. In fact, when you don't need — or perhaps can't use — extra functionality, more is sometimes worse. Small businesses — and small customer-facing teams in larger enterprises — need to carefully evaluate vendors that they are evaluating in order to pick a solution that is right-sized for their needs. Categories and criteria that should be closely evaluated include:

  • Ease of use. Our research finds that 58% of employees interface directly or indirectly with customers. Small customer-facing teams don't have the luxury of deeply configuring or customizing CRM user experiences. Make sure the user experiences that come "out-of'the-box" from your CRM vendor are highly intuitive; that they work on the devices and platforms that your team use; and that they don't impede your productivity in any way.  
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